The conversations and questions for me to think about that I had with Jane and Kari Carrington and Joe Harding from the 15 and 17th of December.

Starting with the chat with Jane and Kari..

To summarise your recent tutorial on Tuesday 15th December with Jane and Kari Carrington:

When I am TRAVELLING: write some more personal thoughts on how your red forms are travelling. You have photographed them on a train seat and contextualised them ‘in transit’-

Think about how you can set up more images which show the viewer that they are moving and in transit.

The  CONTEXT: you mentioned that knowing the context in someone’s work is important to you. Please write a short paragraph about Rachel Whitehead’s white forms in the Tate Modern Turbine hall. Explain how the context of that space is affecting the way in which you are seeing the work.

 REFLECT: on how Tom’s resin Gummi bears have influenced you. Why is the material resin so appealing?

 PHOTOGRAPH: your red forms in a variety of Christmas themed settings.  Consider how the inclusion of a human changes the meaning and scale of the work?

 Draw from your photographs in a range of media

 REFLECT: on how Tom’s resin Gummi bears have influenced you. Why is the material resin so appealing?

 From speaking to Joe Harding on the 17.12.15

It made we want to do my own versions of that and I think that helped with me having the ink cartridge containers as well – not recycling them, keeping them because I thought I would be able to make a use for them. Each time I needed new ink I kept the containers.

The Gummi bears – it was the idea that they were made from something that he found and they had become their own character. And it was the colours and the fact they were made from different things – soap, candles, wax crayons.

He was using his initiative and being smart about it and being creative.

He has given me two of his Gummi bears. One is broken so he’s going to fix that and the other one is pale pink. The one with red on I’ve placed it in my doll’s house and photographed it. I

It’s quite interesting to see them against my figures because they are a lot bigger. I put my figures in the doll’s house.

 THE DOLL’S HOUSE: The figures live in the doll’s house. I think of it as there house. The way I’ve placed some of them they’re sitting having a chat or watching TV. It looks as if they’re settled.

I’m getting to a point where I’m running out of space. I need another house. I worry they’re going to get too settled so at some point I’m going to have to take them out more places and take them round the studio.

I like them in the house but at the same time I want to show them in a new environment. It’s important for them to be seen in a new environment. The house is their home, for my photos and my work to progress I need to show them in different situations/environments that are new.

 CONTEXT: you mentioned that knowing the context in someone’s work is important to you. Please write a short paragraph about Rachel Whiteread’s white forms in the Tate Modern Turbine hall. Explain how the context of that space is affecting the way in which you are seeing the work.

 Context – it’s the unknown versus the known. I like the idea of both. To know a little bit about the work beforehand is important, then you can make up your own mind. I’d want to tell people what my idea was, what the context was  – without being told they might be a bit confused.

Rachel Whiteread’s white forms:

Here it is the piece I am talking about.

whiteread_turbine_hall

The space is not a traditional art gallery or exhibition. She’s making you (they) become part of the art work because you’re [the general public] using that space that she’s left. The public are becoming the artwork. It changes the meaning of the artwork because it’s not just the artwork – people are there as well. It looks like, it is very much like a maze, and they go into different corners and directions. I can imagine the idea of some of my figures being photographed in and around these spaces, especially because they’re coloured, the red resin ones, especially up against the white.

She’s not afraid to let people be involved with it. She’s not afraid to let people be involved with it, experience it. She doesn’t want to keep her art separate. The public are not restricted, so often in art barriers you can only look from a distance, there’s often a barrier.

I would not want people to touch them, not unless they’re people I know.


 

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